Things aren't Always as you Imagine

Day 23:  Brazil

It wasn’t until about 7am that we dragged our exhausted bodies out of the Sambadrome.  Towards the end I was having trouble keeping my eyes open.  My brain was exhausted and still attempting to work overtime in order to process everything I just witnessed.  As we made our way out of the Sambadrome we dragged ourselves to find a taxi.  Because of all the traffic it took twice as long to get back to the apartment.  Once we got back all I wanted was my bed.  As soon as my head hit the pillow I was asleep, dreaming of the spectacular parade that just completed.

It wasn't until about 3pm that we emerged from our apartment for the day.  We stopped at Bonde Sucos for a salgado and then wandered around the city for awhile.  We ended up in Botofoga and decided to walk to Sugar Loaf Mountain from there.  The thing is its not a close walk.  We could see the tram lines, but knew it was far.  We were feeling adventurous and had no idea where we were going exactly, but we followed the tram lines.  We cut across highways and walked for what seemed like an eternity, but we did it.  We found it just as the sun was about to set.  

We bought our tickets and headed up the first tram and watched the sun begin to set.  Sunset in Brazil, check!  Sunsets are like paintings, describing them never does them justice.  You have to see them in person to truly experience their beauty.  Photographs are great, but its a whole different level to see it in person.  I have always loved sunsets, but never appreciated them like I do now.  My Uncle Wayne was a photographer.  When he passed away I got to choose some of his work.  I chose these beautiful photos of a sunrise and sunset over Lake Eerie.  They spoke to me and they still do to this day. Appreciating a photograph of a sunset (even the one in this blog) isn't the same as witnessing it first hand.  Challenge of the day: Watch the sunset once this week.  Continue doing it for the month.  Six months, a year.  Watch the sunset in different places.  Does it evoke different emotions each time? At each different location?  One day you should witness it at Sugarloaf Mountain.

After the sun set we explored the first mountain.  The view were breathtaking.  The only thing Brian and I could compare it to was 95th floor of the John Hancock Building in Chicago or one of my personal favorites, The Lookout in Haiti.  After making our way around the first mountain we boarded the second tram.  When we arrived at the top the view got even better.  Most articles we read said to go to Sugarloaf on a clear day.  I agree on the clear part, but I would argue that seeing it at night is so much better.  The buildings are all lit up and mostly white, the city glows and adds to the beauty and wonder of everything before you.

When we finally had enough we decided to get an Uber and go to the Fogo de Chao we passed on our walk to Sugarloaf.  For those of you that think Fogo de Chao is an American chain, you would be mistaken.  It was started by a Brazilian farming family.  The food was delicious..  It had been what I had been waiting for in Brazil.  I imagined Brazilian churrasco a certain way and that isn't what it is typically like.  

Sometimes things aren’t always as your imagine them to be.  Sometimes they are better.

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Food is something that brings the world together. Each culture has its own traditions and favorite foods. As a self proclaimed foodie, I was so excited to try cuisines in the countries they originated in. During my travels, I have discovered and will undoubtedly continue to discover culinary treasures around the globe. I am honored to share with you, My Elephant Tribe, the amazing meals I have enjoyed throughout the world.

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